Open House Obsession: Three Great Houses to Tour at The Sea Ranch This Weekend

The Sea Ranch is one of the great planned communities of the 1960s, laid out by landscape architect Lawrence Halprin and a significant architectural team– including Charles Moore, Joseph Esherick, William Turnbull– with strict parameters to guide construction following the shed and barn vernacular of California's North Coast. Set on magnificent former grazing lands on the edge of the Pacific Ocean, it's an aesthetic where Mid-Century Modern met Post Modern. Click on the address links for more images.


Where: 60 Black Point Beach Road
When: Saturday, December 28 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm
How Much: $1.195M
What: An original Sea Ranch house by Joseph Esherick, this c.1967 vernacular shingled shed has a matching studio structure across a walled courtyard. Recently reduced from $1.25M, the 2-bed, 2-bath house has been published and is a part of Northern California's architectural heritage– although the main house could use some interior rethinking to restore Esherick's original concept:

What We Love: It's a vintage house nestled into a grove of vintage cypresses– and Esherick designed some of the loveliest houses at The Sea Ranch.


Where: 42145 Rock Cod Road
When: Saturday, December 28 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm
How Much: $2.1M
What: Sea Ranch for Plutocrats. Built in 2007 on an incredible site (at top) this grand 3-bed, 3-bath house has sumptuous interiors, a lovely walled garden (above) and a detached cottage/studio. Not crazy about the decor and some plumbing details, but all that's easily changed.

What We Love: The unbelievably well-equipped kitchen and the views.


Where: 36689 Timber Ridge Road
When: Saturday, December 28 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm
How Much: $779M
What: Not all Sea Ranch houses are set out on former grazing lands– this spacious 2-bed, 2-bath built in 1992 is uphill and nestled into the edge of a second-growth– but still splendid– forest.

What We Love: The setting, the view, and the extensive interior use of drywall instead of the ubiquitous fir paneling.

 

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